Monday, October 22, 2018

#9 - "Weights and Measures"


#10 - Full STEAM ahead for Michelle, Mike, Elaine, Peyton, Milt, and Joani as it was the Steam Engine!




"Weights and Measures"



The clock tower at the Fairhaven Town Hall had a huge bell in it. Fortunately, I was NOT in the area when it struck the hour! These items were used to counterbalance the clock mechanism. At present they were just resting in place. I'm not sure if they were still in use. 


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#9

#9 is the global system of interconnected computer networks that use the (TCP/IP) to link devices worldwide. It is a network of networks that consists of private, public, academic, business, and government networks of local to global scope, linked by a broad array of electronic, wireless, and optical networking technologies. It carries a vast range of information resources and services, such as the inter-linked hypertext documents and applications, electronic mail, and file sharing!

Its origins date back to research commissioned by the federal government of the U. S. in the 1960s to build robust, fault-tolerant communication with computer networks. The funding of the NSF Network as a new backbone in the 1980s, as well as private funding for other commercial extensions, led to worldwide participation in the development of new networking technologies, and the merger of many networks.



Murphy's Laws


Miksch's Law. . .


If a string has one end, 

then it has another end.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Auto Repair Chart"



Monday, October 15, 2018

#10 - "Oil Pump II"



#11 nitrogen fixation! Those who chose "C" were more correct than the others - Michelle, Joani, Peyton, and Tony!




"Oil Pump II"



At the Stone Mill I came across this pump still attached to a large drum. I believe it was used to get the oil or grease from the drum into the proper machinery. What fascinated me the most was seeing the cobwebs on it. I guess this hand device had not been disturbed in quite some time. Because of the little hint of blue paint on the rust, I opted to keep this in color and not try a B&W conversion. Also, the rust and yellow on the back wall helped to pop out the pump. 

Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#10 - Top Ten Time!

The use of boiling water to produce mechanical motion goes back over 2000 years, but early devices were not practical. The Spanish inventor Beaumont obtained a patent for a rudimentary water pump in 1606. In 1698 Thomas Savery patented a pump that used this medium in direct contact with the water being pumped. Savery's device created a partial vacuum and draw water into a chamber, and then applied pressurized medium  to further pump the water.

Thomas Newcomen’s idea was the first commercial true #10 using a piston, and was used in 1712 for removing flood water from a mine. 104 were in use by 1733. Eventually over two thousand of them were installed.

In 1781 Scottish engineer James Watt patented his invention that produced continuous rotary motion. Watt's ten- horsepower devices enabled a wide range of manufacturing machinery to be powered. They could be sited anywhere that water and coal or wood fuel could be obtained. This stationary invention was a key component of the Industrial Revolution, allowing factories to locate where water power was unavailable.


# TEN powered the factories, trains, and ships that drove the Industrial Revolution!



Murphy's Laws


 First Law of Laboratory Work. . .


Hot glass looks exactly the same as cold glass.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Obsession Cure"


Monday, October 8, 2018

#11 - "Gearing Up"



#12 was sanitation systems! Well done, Peyton, Joani, Michelle, Elaine, Milt, and Mike!




"Gearing Up"



Another recent grab from Slater's Mill was this set of gears that helped to run the elaborate cotong threading machines. The docent was pretty sure that any machine designs that were brought over from England had to be memorized in detail as it was illegal to have hard copies of them! These devices were made up of thousand of pieces! 


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#11
#11 is essential for some forms of life because inorganic nitrogen compounds are required for the biosynthesis of the basic building blocks of plants, animals and other life forms, e.g., nucleotides for DNA and RNA, and amino acids for proteins. Therefore, as part of the nitrogen cycle, it is essential for agriculture and the manufacture of fertilizer. 

It is also, indirectly, relevant to the manufacture of all chemical compounds that contain nitrogen, which includes explosives, most pharmaceuticals, and dyes. This process is carried out naturally in the soil by a wide range of nitrogen fixing bacteria.

The German chemist Fritz Haber, also the father of chemical weapons, won a Nobel Prize for his development of the ammonia-synthesis process, which was used to create a new class of fertilizers central to the green revolution (No. 22).

I realize these clues are not very helpful so if you still need help, go to the bottom of this week's blog for multiple choices. . . 



Murphy's Laws


Lowrey's Law. . .

If it jams -- force it. 

If it breaks, 
it needed replacing anyway.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .



Possible Answers:
A. Nitrogen Fixation B. Nitrogen Fixation



                    C. Nitrogen Fixation D. Nitrogen Fixation

Monday, October 1, 2018

#12 - "No Escape Hatch"



#13  refrigeration! Slow week out there or the answer was too easy. Thanks for responding - Elaine, Mike, Peyton, and Joani!




"No Escape Hatch!"



 Secured hatches were all over the Boston Waterworks Museum. I especially liked this one because of the red against that light gray. The peeling paint around the hatch as well as that situation on the red cover was an added bonus. Trying to keep it simple, I simply filled the frame with it!


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#12

A major reason we live 40 years longer than we did in 1880! 

Major human settlements could initially develop only where fresh surface water was plentiful, such as near rivers or natural springs. Throughout history people have devised systems to get water into their communities and households, and to dispose (and later also treat) wastewater. The focus of #12 at that time was on conveying this disposal to a natural body of water where it would be diluted and dissipated.

In ancient Rome this was quite extensive. These systems consisted of stone and wooden drains to collect and remove wastewater from populated areas. It is estimated that the first devices of ancient Rome were built between 800 and 735 BCE. 


There is little record of other systems in most of Europe until the High Middle Ages. Unsanitary conditions and overcrowding were widespread throughout Europe and Asia at this time. This resulted in pandemics such as the Black Death (1347-1351), which killed tens of millions of people. Very high infant and child mortality prevailed in Europe throughout medieval times, due partly to deficiencies in setting up #12.



Murphy's Laws


Prudhomme's Law of Window Cleaning. . .

It's always on the other side!


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"MAGA, sort of. . ."


Monday, September 24, 2018

#13 - "Hydrant Cover"



#14 was gunpowder! Well done Elaine, Milt, Mike, Peyton, and Joani!




"Hydrant Cover"



I can't tell you how many times I heard judges, presenters, and workshop instructors remind me to look behind, look up, and even look down! As I was meandering my way through the sub-basement of the Boston Waterworks Museum, I noticed the covering under which housed a hydrant. 

Have you ever appreciated the craftsmanship of older generations? A simple plate would have served the purpose! But someone thought not only to have the company and the object under it on this cover but also finished it with a balanced design! Kind of reminded me of the details on our vehicles from the past - chrome, decals, emblems, etc. - the work of many was readily seen all over these automobiles. 


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#13



“Discovering how to make cold would change the way we eat - and live - almost as profoundly as discovering how to cook.” 

History behind #13: The seasonal harvesting of snow and ice is an ancient practice estimated to have begun earlier than 1000 B.C. However, little is known about the construction of these ice cellars or what the ice was used for. 

The next ancient society to harvest ice may have been the Jews according to the book of Proverbs, which reads, “As the cold of snow in the time of harvest, so is a faithful messenger to them who sent him.” Historians have interpreted this to mean that the Jews used ice to cool beverages rather than to preserve food. 

Other ancient cultures such as the Greeks and the Romans dug large snow pits insulated with grass, chaff, or branches of trees. 

In the Australian outback before a reliable electricity supply was available where the weather could be hot and dry, many farmers used a “Coolgardie safe". This consisted of a room with hessian "curtains" hanging from the ceiling soaked in water. The water would evaporate and thereby cool the hessian curtains and thereby the air circulating in the room. This would allow many perishables such as fruit, butter, and cured meats to be kept that would normally spoil in the heat.



Murphy's Laws


Kafka's Law. . .


In the fight between you and the world, 
back the world.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Best of Friends"


Monday, September 17, 2018

#14 - "Worthington/Snow Engine"



#15 was the  airplane! Right? Michelle, Peyton, Milt, Joani, Elaine, and Mike.




"Worthington/Snow Engine"



At the turn of the century, a company in Buffalo, NY began to revolutionize the steam engine business. Henry Worthington started the business around the 1840s but it was his sons who took it to the next level of international prominence! James Snow had been building steam engines back in 1889. He finally joined up with the Worthingtons to produce the Worthington/Snow steam engine. This massive machine can be viewed at the Haul of Fame in CT.


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#14

#14 is also known as black powder to distinguish it from modern smokeless powder, is the earliest known chemical  explosive. It consists of a mixture of  sulphur, charcoal, and saltpeter. The sulfur and charcoal act as fuels while the saltpeter is an oxidizer. Because of its incendiary properties and the amount of heat and gas volume that it generates, #14 has been widely used as a propellant in firearms, artillery, rockets, and fireworks. 

It was invented in 9th-century China and spread throughout most parts of Eurasia by the end of the 13th century.[3] Originally developed by the Taoists for medicinal purposes, it was first used for warfare about 1000 AD.


Today firearms using this invention are limited primarily to hunting, target shooting, and bulletless historical reenactments.

Outsourced killing to a machine!

Murphy's Laws

Meteorological Law. . .

As soon as the stewardess serves coffee, 
the airliner encounters turbulence.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Got Tasered!


Monday, September 10, 2018

#15 - "Plethora of Oil Cans"



#16 was the personal computer! Still have Peyton, Joani, Milt, and Michelle out there. . .




"Plethora of Oil Cans"



I was at the right place at the right time a few years back when someone offered an opportunity to shoot inside of the garage belonging to radio personalities Click and Clack!

Every year the two car guys host a road rallye at their place in Middleborough. Their collection of antique cars and other memorabilia was fascinating. Downstairs they had an entire soda fountain set up - with a heavy presence of Coca-Cola items!

On one of the shelves they spread out their collection of oil cans. All kinds of shapes and sizes filled the space.

Looking back on that day, I don't think the invite was extended to the handful of us who did show up but the hosts were gracious in allowing us to get our shots!


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#15



Transformed travel, warfare, and our view of the world! 


The Wright Brothers are credited with inventing and getting #15 to perform in 1903! See, no multiple choices today!


(Kitty Hawk Recreation)

They built on the works of George Cayley dating from 1799, when he set forth the concept of the modern device. Between 1867 and 1896, the German pioneer Otto Lilienthal also studied this concept. Following its limited use in World War I, the technology continued to develop. #15 had a presence in all the major battles of WWII.

Murphy's Laws


 Woltman's Law. . .


Never program and drink beer at the same time.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Much Needed!"