Monday, February 19, 2018

#44 - "Riveting. . ."



#45 was television. . . Michelle, Jim, Tony, Peyton, Elaine, Joani, and Mike all came through. And, welcome to Joyce who is a first-time respondee!




"Riveting"



The Boston Waterworks Museum was a photographer's dream location! No matter where I turned there was another shot to be taken. Here I came in tight on this set of rivets securing this pipe. I liked the leading line produced by the rivet heads. Time to move on to the next photo op here. . .   


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#44
Since prehistoric times, mankind was trying to solve this dilemma. The basic concept behind it was said to have been applied in ancient Egypt, where reeds were hung in windows and were moistened with trickling water.

The 2nd-century Chinese mechanical engineer and inventor Ding Haun of the Han Dynasty invented a system powered by prisoners.

Another technique involved the business of harvesting ice during winter and storing for use in summer - this became popular towards the late 17th century. Eventually, this practice was replaced by mechanical machines. The Dutch inventor Cornelius Drebbel demonstrated "Turning Summer into Winter" as an early form of "Invention #44!'



Murphy's Laws


Sattlinger's Law. . .


It works better if - 
you plug it in!


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"No Thai, Sorry!



Monday, February 12, 2018

#45 - "The Ammeter. . ."




#46 was anesthesia! A real knockout by Michelle, Mike, Elaine, Peyton, and Joani!




"The Weston Ammeter"





Still hanging around and reaping the photo ops of the Boston Waterworks Museum!

There were numerous gauges, meters, and other devices to measure affixed to walls, machinery, and other mechanical items. I liked the grunge look of this ammeter - which I found out was used to measure amps. It had to be preserved in color as the rust would have been lost in a B&W conversion.


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#45


 became available in crude experimental forms in the late 1920s, but it would still be several years before the new technology was marketed to consumers. After World War II, an improved form of it became popular in the United States and Britain, and soon they became commonplace in homes, businesses, and institutions. During the 1950s, it was the primary medium for influencing public opinion.] In the mid-1960s, color was introduced in the US and most other developed countries.



Murphy's Laws


Law of the OR. . .


Never say "oops" in the operating room!


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Let Me Out!!"



Monday, February 5, 2018

#46 - "Bug Sprayer. . ."






#47 was the nail - let's see who "nailed" it. . . Milt, Tony, Elaine, Joani, Mike, Jim, and Peyton. I had two refrigerators (Michelle was one of them) in the mix as well.




"Bug Sprayer"



Those of us who are old enough remember this time-tested dispenser of insect-killing chemicals - just had to remember to point it AWAY from people.

This device was resting comfortably on a shelf in an abandoned house in Carver. I was fortunate enough to have joined up with two other photo club members for this shoot. The contents of the dwelling were a testimony to "time standing still." Items from the late forties and early fifties were all over the place - from the products in the medicine cabinet to the hand pump on the kitchen sink to the newspapers still opened up around the parlor.

In one of the bedrooms, I found a sweater hanging under this shelf resident. Obviously, it was working as there was not one moth-eaten hole in that garment!


Greatest Inventions of All Time!

Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#46


#46 is a state of temporary induced loss of sensation or awareness which enables the painless performance of medical procedures that would otherwise cause severe or intolerable pain to a patient. 

Three broad categories exist - it may include analgesia (relief from or prevention of pain), paralysis (muscle relaxation), amnesia (loss of memory), or unconsciousness.



Murphy's Laws


Law of Television. . .


If you have only watched a TV series once, 
and you watch it again, 
it will most likely be a rerun of the same episode.



Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Thin Mints?"




Monday, January 29, 2018

#47 - "Intake Valve"





#48 was the lever - we had guesses for the sled. Respondents were Elaine, Joani, Tony, Mike, Peyton, Doris, and Michelle!




"Intake Valve"



The Boston Waterworks Museum offered numerous opportunities to shoot "industrial" and I took full advantage of that!

Getting up close and in tight, I found this copper configuration with a valve on a holding tank. I had originally converted this to a monochrome but felt the colors played off each other well enough to remain as it was originally captured.


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#47

This idea “extended lives by enabling people to have shelter.” 
Categorized into three distinct eras:
Hand-wrought – earliest found in ancient Egypt
Cut – simplified its production in England around  1790 but patented by Jacob Perkins in America.

Wire – its arrival on the scene decreased the need for its two predecessors. By 1913 90% of this invention were of the wire variety.

You have most certainly used and benefited from #47!


Murphy's Laws


 Mencken's Law


Those who can - do. 
Those who cannot - teach. 
Those who cannot do or teach - 
administrate!


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .



"The Stalemate. . ."




Monday, January 22, 2018

#48 - "Stamp Mill Shovel"





#49 was the assembly line. . . Great start for Michelle, Peyton, Tony, Milt, Joani, Elaine, and Mike!




"Stamp Mill Shovel"



The Stamp Mill was the place where silver and gold ore was separated from its original resting place. This was the only building in the Bodie State Park / Ghost Town where one could get inside - with a tour guide, of course. The rest of the buildings were in a state of arrested decay - left alone to weather with minimum care.

As I passed by this tool, I wondered if it was an Ames Shovel? Ames Shovels were used throughout the world on numerous projects as early as the Revolutionary War. This primal digging device was manufactured only a few miles from my home in nearby Easton. The Ames Family left its mark throughout the entire town - the public library, town hall, and several structures used for shops and housing.



Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#48


The Egyptians had not yet discovered the wheel when they built their pyramids; they are thought to have relied heavily on these devices instead. They were able to move objects weighing more than 100 tons with them! These objects are further classified into three groups depending where the weight is placed.



Murphy's Laws


The Puncture Principle


Nails are selectively attracted 
to the inside wheel on a dual wheeled vehicle!


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Keep your distance!




Monday, January 15, 2018

#49 - "The S Pipe"




Back for 2018 we have Elaine, Joani, Michelle, Milt and Tony! All of the aforementioned did know that #50 was the combine harvester! Elaine and Joani had extra help as they both had one of these on their farms! I don't think #49 would be found there???




"S Pipe"



Because we had a small group of photographers in the area, one of the docents took us into the basement of the Boston Waterworks Museum. I passed by this pipe several times. Each pass-by had me stopping to look at it. I knew there was a shot there but had to get the angle just right. Some post-processing in PhotoShop allowed me to bring out the shadowed areas while blacking out the distractions. I liked the fluidity of the scene!


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#49

Ransom Olds incorporated this concept as early as 1901 - however much credit goes to another manufacturer who In 1913 used this device to turn a craft-based economy into a mass-market one! This concept allowed costs to be more reasonable, making the final product more affordable.



Murphy's Laws


Second Law of Physics:


You can't push on a rope!


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Quadruple Play!"





Monday, January 8, 2018

Something Different. . .


My final City of the World was Honolulu. Guess most of you tired out or were still hung over as only Tony and Joani checked in. Jim was a few thousand miles to the east in Kyoto.

So what next???


After looking over my images from 2017, I realized I don't have enough to fill up one year's worth of postings. So I decided to share with you one of my themes.

For 2018, the main focus will be industrial. Over the past two-plus years, I have managed to shoot the insides of some very interesting buildings.

Since I have gone the "industrial" route, I thought I'd let you try your best guess as to some of the most impressive inventions of all-time. I'll give as much of a hint as possible without giving away the answer. 


And, we'll sift through the remaining "Murphy's Laws" that we opened up last year.

Perhaps, I can find some humorous items to finish off the weekly blog.

Are you ready?


"Triple X Escape"



This image was shot at the rear of the Stone Mill in Lawrence during the annual Scott Kelby Photowalk. For the second year I decided to drive the distance and meet up with the organizers of this walk off Ret. 495. The previous year we had ten photographers while for 2017, there were about forty-five!

At each photowalk the organizers select one image to represent the group and send that off to Kelby. For the past two years both of my images were the "Chosen Ones!" For me, it was the patterns with the criss-crossed ladders and the colorful doorways.


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professionals. Their task was to create a list of "The Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#50
Our first invention was patented in 1834 by Hiram Moore and was credited with mechanizing the farm thus allowing those working the land more time to do other types of work around the farm! This device did the reaping, threshing, and willowing in one process! 



Murphy's Laws


Man In The Street Law

The number of people watching you is 
directly proportional to the stupidity of your action.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .