Monday, June 25, 2018

#26 - "Nuts and Bolts"



#27 was the Mechanized Clock - and right on time were Michelle, Peyton, Joani, Mike, and Elaine!




"Nuts and Bolts"



Back at the Boston Waterworks Museum! As I had mentioned there was a lot to focus upon and in the few hours, I had to determine which objects would get my full attention! 
 This one was all about the lining up of the nuts and bolts and the color. There were several other shots within this one area that I managed to capture.

Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#26

Before it, Joel Mokyr says, “information could move no faster than a man on horseback!”

An electrical #26 was independently developed and patented in the U.S.  in 1837 by Samuel Morse. With his assistant, Alfred Vail  they developed a signaling alphabet. 
The first message in the United States was sent by Morse on 11 January 1838, across two miles (3 km) of wire “What hath God Wrought” "from the Capitol in Washington to the old Mt. Clare Depot in Baltimore. 

The overland device connected the west coast of the continent to the east coast by 24 October 1861, bringing an end to the Pony Express.


Murphy's Laws


New Theory of Relativity. . .


How long a minute is depends
 on which side of the bathroom door you are on!


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Updating One's Avatar"


Monday, June 18, 2018

#27 - "Stamp Mill Machinery"



#28 was the radio! Heard from Milt, Elaine, Peyton, Joani, and Mike!




"Stamp Mill Machinery"



Bodie Ghost Town did not have much from the Industrial Genre but it was a wealth of photo ops for those of us who were there. This was one of several massive engines that drove the smashing equipment. I wondered just how noisy this place was? Add in the amount of dust they inhaled and you have a major health disaster! Of note, the place from which this machine was built - Fitchburg, MA!


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#27


In Europe, between 1280 and 1320, there was an increase in the number of references to these devices in church records, and this probably indicates that a new type had been devised. Existing ones used water power and were being adapted to take their driving power from falling weights.


#27 was intended for two main purposes: for signaling and notification and for modeling the solar system. The former purpose is administrative, the latter arises naturally given the scholarly interests in astronomy, science, astrology, and how these subjects integrated with the religious philosophy of the time. 


In 1283, a large one was installed at Dunstable Priory - its location suggests that it was not a water driven.


It quantified time.



Murphy's Laws


Klipstein's Lament. . .


All warranty and guarantee clauses are
voided by payment of the invoice.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"So much better..."


Monday, June 11, 2018

#28 - "Disconnected. . ."



#29 was Photography! Easy one, er no? Peyton, Michelle, Mike, Elaine, and Joani all knew it was photography!




"Disconnected



Boston Waterworks Museum was a plethora (love throwing that word in every so often) of things to photograph. The museum was a challenge for your camera eye. Overwhelming at first but once you walked around and began to find a theme (smalls, gauges, plumbing, etc.) the entire place opened anew for you. I could have come home with close to several hundred images but focused on a few themes to get my take home load to about three hundred!

This piece got me wondering as to what it might have shut off or fed fluids into? Just how many more pieces of pipe were joined here??? 


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#28

The first demonstration of electronic mass media’s power to spread ideas and homogenize culture!

As early as 1864 James Clerk Maxwell showed mathematically that electromagnetic waves could propagate through free space. The effects of electromagnetic waves were actually observed before and after Maxwell's work by many inventors and experimenters including George Adams (1780-1784), Luigi Galvani(1791), Peter Samuel Munk (1835), Joseph Henry, (1842), Thomas Edison (1875).


Edison gave the effect the name “etheric force” and Hughes detected a spark impulse up to 500 yards with a portable receiver, but none could identify what caused the phenomenon and it was usually written off as electromagnetic induction. In 1886 Rudolf Heinrich Hertz noticed the same sparking phenomenon and, in published experiments (1887-1888), was able to demonstrate the existence of electromagnetic waves in an experiment confirming Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism! 


Murphy's Laws


Rule of Radio Reception. . .
(dated)


Your walkman radio won't pick up
 the station you want to hear most!



Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Ain't It the Truth. . ."


Monday, June 4, 2018

#29 - "Control Panel"


#30 was the moldboard plow! My Esteemed Panel of Judges was very lenient on submitted responses - approved were Peyton, Elaine, Michelle, Joani, Tony, Milt, and Mike.




"Control Panel"



Boston Waterworks Museum was the setting for this week's industrial shot. This set of gauges kept calling me over to take their picture. They were patiently lined up but by the time I got there one was called away - hence the open space second from the right. He never came back as I worked my way back over there several more times. Not sure what their function was on the machine at the BWM but they were all shined up and ready to pose!


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#29

From the early 19th century this one is my personal favorite as it changed journalism, art, culture, and how we see ourselves forever!


#29 is employed in many fields of science, manufacturing, and business, as well as its more direct uses for art, film and video production, recreational purposes, hobby, and mass communication.
Names like Daguerre and Eastman were pioneers of good old #29



Murphy's Laws


The N-1 Law. . .


If you need four screws for the job, 
the first three are easy to find.



Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Musical Direction"



Monday, May 28, 2018

#30 - "Neatly Wrapped"


#31 was the Archimedes Screw! Well done my Blog Followers - Milt, Michelle, Mike, Elaine, and Joani.




"Neatly Wrapped"



This spool of thick wire cable has certainly stood the test of time! The coiled wire rests comfortably in the Haul of Fame. As I did last week, I focused on part of the whole rather than the entire item. I was intrigued by the rainbow of colors in this rusting cable.

I wouldn't want to be within a thousand feet of this if it ever sprung!


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#30

This first farming device not only dug soil up but turned it over, allowing for the cultivation of harder ground. Without it, agriculture as we know it would not exist in northern Europe or the American Midwest.

#30 greatly reduced the amount of time needed to prepare a field, and as a consequence, allowed a farmer to work a larger area of land. In addition, the resulting pattern of low  and high ridges in the soil forms water channels, allowing the soil to drain. In areas where snow buildup causes difficulties, this lets farmers plant the soil earlier, as the snow runoff drains away more quickly.


No help from me on #30!




Murphy's Laws


First Rule of Rural Mechanics. . .


If it works, 
don't fix it.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .



"Coffin Shopping"


Monday, May 21, 2018

#31 - "Tightly Coiled"


#32 was the cotton gin! Great memory recall from Peyton, Milt, Elaine, Joani, Mike, and Michelle (extra credit for responding from recent surgery).




"Tightly Coiled"



The Haul of Fame was one fun shoot. I was planning on a return trip this year after a light snowfall but that never happened - not the snow but my scheduling it!

This was one of the springs on a rusting earth-moving machine. For me, the final shot is usually a part of the whole rather than the whole. I could have focused on the entire tire assembly area but I felt this tightly coiled spring told the story I was looking for.


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#31

This Greek scientist is believed to have designed one of the first water pumps, a device that pushed water up a tube. It transformed irrigation and remains in use today at many sewage-treatment plants.



I realize these clues are not very helpful so if you still need help, go to the bottom of this week's blog for multiple choices. . . 



Murphy's Laws


 Julian's Law. . .


If it says "one size fits all," 
it doesn't fit anyone.



Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Dryer Miracle"



1. Pythorius Drill      2. Archimedes Screw  
3. Darius Well          4. Zorba's Combine


Monday, May 14, 2018

#32 - "Powering It Up. . ."



#33 was Pasteurization as Elaine, Mike, Tony, Joani, Michelle, and Milt knew!




"Powering It Up. . ."



I was fortunate to be able to join a few of my fellow photo club members to tour an abandoned factory in EB. It was very eerie with the small shafts of light coming in through the holes in the roof and the careful footing to avoid falling through to the lower level while trying to focus on what was left behind.

This was a set of three fuses needed to power up one of the machines. The machine was long gone but this energy source was still on the wall. 

Today this abandoned factory is still standing but a quick look will remind you that entering it may prove fatal - too much falling down around it!


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#32
A patent was applied for #32 on October 28, 1793; the patent was granted on March 14, 1794, but was not validated until 1807. 

There is slight controversy over whether the idea of theis invention and its constituent elements are correctly attributed to Eli Whitney. The popular image of Whitney inventing it is attributed to an article on the subject written in the early 1870s and later reprinted in 1910 in The Library of Southern Literature. In this article, the author claimed suggested to Whitney the use of a brush-like component instrumental in separating out the seeds. 


Whitney's model was capable of cleaning 50 pounds (23 kg) of lint per day. The model consisted of a wooden cylinder surrounded by rows of slender spikes, which pulled the lint through the bars of a comb-like grid.[16] The grids were closely spaced, preventing the seeds from passing through. Loose fibers were brushed off, preventing the mechanism from jamming.

Institutionalized the industry—and slavery—in the American South.

Nah, you are on your own with this one as well!


Murphy's Laws


Paul's Law of Group Insurance. . .


The illness you come down with 
is the one ailment 
not covered under your insurance policy.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .