Monday, August 13, 2018

#19 - "Gearing Up"



#20 was the Pill. . .

Well done my loyal followers - Peyton, Elaine, Mike, Tony, Milt, Michelle, Joani, and photo-friend from Idaho, Kathy B!




"Gearing Up"



Not much to shoot at this former textile mill (Stone Mill) so it was a challenge to find anything during my three hours there. This window opening device had fallen off the overhead skylights and was resting on a barrel. Later I was able to shoot others in their normal settings. 

Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#19
#19 became the basis of modern industry

The Bessemer process was the first inexpensive industrial process for the mass production of ore.

The key principle is the removal of impurities from the ore by oxidation with air being blown through the molten ore. The oxidation also raises the temperature of the mass and keeps it molten.


The modern process is named after its inventor, the Englishman Henry Bessemer,  who took out a patent on the process in 1856. The process was said to be independently discovered in 1851 by the American inventor William Kelly though there is little to back up this claim.




Murphy's Laws


Woods's Refutation of the First Law of Socio-Genetics


On the contrary, 
if you never procreate, neither will your kids.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Glad I Wasn't There!"


Monday, August 6, 2018

#20 - "Double Valve"


#21 was Nuclear Fission! Good to see that Milt, Tony, Elaine, Michelle, Joani, Peyton, and Mike knew it as well.




"Double Valve"



I wondered, "Does this valve really belong to this machine or was it added for effect?" "And, why did it need two turn-off devices?" 

Well, I never got an answer to either concern but I liked it well enough to spend some time checking out the angles at the Boston Waterworks Museum. 

The angles that these valves were left in and the colors complimenting each other and popping them out from the background added to my liking of this industrial item.


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#20

in 1960, #20 launched a social revolution!


It was first approved for use in the United States in 1960, and became a very popular form of birth control. They are currently used by more than 100 million women worldwide and by almost 12 million women in the United States. As of 2012, 16% of U.S. women aged 15–44 reported being on it, making it the most widely used method among women of that age range. Use varies widely by country, age, education, and marital status. One third of women aged 16–49 in the United Kingdom currently use either the it compared with only 1% of women in Japan.

No multiple choices this week. . .


Murphy's Laws

Postal Postulate. . .


The announcement of the one event 
you most wanted to attend 
will arrive in the mail 
the day after the it has taken place!


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .



Monday, July 30, 2018

#21 - "Tooth and Gear"



#22 was the Green Revolution - and that is just what Milt, Elaine, Mike, Peyton, Joani, and Michelle thought.




"Tooth and Gear"



Not exactly sure what these teeth were supposed to be driving but they looked impressive! The original color of the machine had been invaded by someone trying to cover over the orange. These beasts of construction were the kings of the site. This shot comes to via the Haul of Fame.


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#21
Gave humans new power for destruction and creation. . .

#21 is either a reaction or a decay process in which the nucleus of an atom splits into smaller parts. The process often produces free neutrons and game protons and releases a very large amount of energy even by the energetic standards of radioactive decay.

This process of heavy elements was discovered on December 17, 1938 by German Otto Hahn and his assistant Fritz Strassmann, and explained theoretically in January 1939. 

I realize these clues are not very helpful so if you still need help, go to the bottom of this week's blog for multiple choices. . .



Murphy's Laws


Law of Public Transit. . .


If you start walking, 
the first bus will come precisely when 
you are halfway between stops.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Sign Says It All!"



A. Nuclear fission  B. Nitro glycerin 
C. Solar power   D. Gas turbine engine 

Monday, July 23, 2018

#22 - "Fuse Boxes"


#23 was the Sextant! Well, I heard from Milt and Milt. Also, Milt chimed in and his alter-ego, Milt as well. There were several other Milts in the got it right list!




"Fuse Boxes"



Back to the EB Abandoned Factory! These fuse boxes were open for inspection and I'm sure they would have some story to tell about what took place within these walls. Ah, the good ol' days when the power went out and you had to find the fuse box in the dark and replace the burnt out item. In my youth this meant fumbling your way down three flights of stairs to the basement and then through the dark recesses of this lower level to the actual box. Had to remember to bring a fuse with you or it meant retracing your steps back to the third floor! Ah, the good ol' days. . .


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#22
is a set of research and the development of technology transfer initiatives occurring between the 1930s and the late 1960s, that increased agricultural production worldwide, particularly in the developing world, beginning most markedly in the late 1960s. The initiatives resulted in the adoption of new technologies, including, high-yield varieties (HYVs) of cereals, especially dwarf wheats and rices, in association with chemical fertilizers and with controlled water-supply and new methods of cultivation, including mechanization. All of these together were seen as a 'package of practices' to supersede 'traditional' technology and to be adopted as a whole.

Both the Ford Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation were heavily involved. One key leader was Norman Borlaug, the agricultural economist who devised this approach, has been credited with saving more than 1 billion people from starvation, received the Nobel
eace Prize in 1970.

I realize these clues are not very helpful so if you still need help, go to the bottom of this week's blog for multiple choices. . . 







Murphy's Laws


Rune's Rule. . .


If you don't care where you are, 
you ain't lost!


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Air Space Museum"




A. Water sprinklers  B. Co-op Farming  
C. Pesticides  D. The Green Revolution  

Monday, July 16, 2018

#23 - "Rusted Out"



#24 was the Telephone - as if you didn't know! 

Peyton, Milt, Joani, Michelle, and Mike all answered the call!



"Rusted Out"



Could have spent several days at the Haul of Fame! I did want to return when there was a dusting of snow to give the rusting vehicles a different look - perhaps by the end of December?

This metal identification label was affixed to the side of a large steam shovel. The colors came together for this shot. Rust is always a fun photographic subject.


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#23 made maps out of stars.


It is a doubly reflecting navigation instrument  that measures the angular distance between two visible objects. The primary use of a sextant is to measure the angle between an astronomical object and the horizon for the purposes of celestial navigation. The estimation of this angle, the altitude, is known as sighting or shooting the object, or taking a sight. The angle, and the time when it was measured, can be used to calculate a position line on a nautical or aeronautical chart. The principle of the instrument was first implemented around 1731 by John Hadley and Thomas Godfrey, but it was also found later in the unpublished writings of Issac Newton.


Murphy's Laws


Johnson's Second Law. . .


If, in the course of several months, 
only three worthwhile social events take place, 
they will all fall on the same evening.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"New Arrivals"


Monday, July 9, 2018

#24 - "Screwing Around. . ."



#25 was Alphabetization or the Alphabet! Tony, Mike, Elaine, Peyton, and Joani found time to check in.




"Screwing Around"



This bucket of screws and bolts were left behind after the East Bridgewater factory had been totally disassembled. Was it the time spent in the bucket that caused them to rust or were they already in that state when they were taken off the various pieces of equipment throughout the facility. Guess we'll never know!


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#24

is a device that permits two or more users to conduct a conversation when they are too far apart to be heard directly. It converts sound, typically and most efficiently the human voice, into electronic signals that are transmitted via cables and other communication channels to similar device which reproduces the sound to the receiving user.


In 1876, Scottish emigrant Alexander Graham Bell was the first to be granted a United States patent for a device that produced clearly intelligible replication of the human voice. This instrument was further developed by many others. #24 was the first device in history that enabled people to talk directly with each other across large distances. They rapidly became indispensable to businesses, government, and households, and are today some of the most widely used small appliances!

This is the easiest one so far - no excuses for missing #24!

Murphy's Laws


Kensington's Observation. . .


The two most common elements in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity!


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Time Well Spent?"


Monday, July 2, 2018

#25 - "Shut-off Valve"



#26 was the Telegraph! Odd that the telegraph was rated higher than the radio - but that's why they had a panel of experts pick these. Speaking of picking - Milt, Peyton, Michelle, Mike, Joani, Elaine and Kathy B. Kathy and I first met on a photo shoot in NH. I visited her and Doug in NC before they moved to Idaho. Great to know she is still following along. .  .




"Shut-off Valve"



Boston Waterworks Museum here! This valve caught my attention due to its location on the gray wall. The red handwheel against the gray popped this industrial device. And, there there was the brass fittings the gave this a three-dimensional look! One of my favorite of my Industrial Collection.


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#25 comes to us from the first millennium b.c.!
 May have contributed to the rise of societies that used phonetic ones over those that used ideographic ones
The first dates back to the Middle Bronze Age (1500–1200 B.C.). Egyptians were already using hieroglyphs. However, hieroglyphs consisted of picture representations. Hieroglyphs were commonly used in depicting aspects found in sacred writings.

Here are a few known facts about #25:
  • Historians do not know who invented it.
  • Ancient civilizations eventually produced a universal one.
  • Technology enables people to compile lists in this particular order.
Basically it is a system whereby strings of characters are placed in order based on the position of the characters in the conventional ordering. 


Murphy's Laws


 Kovac's Conundrum. . .


When you dial a wrong number, 
you never get a busy signal.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"If at first. . ."