Monday, December 10, 2018

#2 - "WTC Cross"



#3 was penicillin! A shot in the arm from Elaine, Peyton, Tony, Milt,  Mike, and Joani.




"WTC Cross"



Some time after the tragedy of 9/11, I was in NYC. My wife and I walked around various sites and came upon this makeshift memorial to 9/11 at Ground Zero. The beams formed a cross and someone took it upon himself to make it a memorial. 

I am not sure where this WTC Cross finally ended up. I do know my hometown managed to get one section of the steel girders for display at our fire station.




Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#2 - Winding Down. . .

Our next invention made it possible for at least eight of the top 50 inventions to be! It happened somewhere in the late 19th century.

#2 is the set of physical phenomena associated with the presence and motion of matter that has a property of electric charge. In early days, it was considered as being not related to magnetism. Later on, many experimental results and the development of Maxwell’s equations indicated that both #2 and magnetism are from a single phenomenon. 

This Top Ten invention is at the heart of many modern technologies. It has been studied since antiquity, though progress in theoretical understanding remained slow until the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Even then, practical applications for it were few, and it would not be until the late nineteenth century that engineers were able to put it to industrial and residential use. The rapid expansion in this technology at this time transformed industry and society, becoming a driving force for the Second Industrial Revolution. 


Hint: Menlo Park   



Murphy's Laws


First Maxim of Computers. . .


To err is human, 
but to really screw things up 
requires a computer!


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Pride Cometh. . ."


Monday, December 3, 2018

#3 - "Gearing Up II"



#4 was the semiconductor! Well done my semi-conductor friends - Peyton, Michelle, Milt, Joani, and Mike. Elaine claims she never got the blog. . .




"Gearing Up II"



Still in Slater's Mill, I found these gears waiting patiently for me. These gears are quite larger than those from last week but this is what was needed to run these mill devices smoothly - gears of all sizes. I did like the accessibility and the up and down position of these two.


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.


#3

#3 was accidentally discovered in 1928, though antibiotics were not widely distributed until after World War II, when they became the silver bullet for any number of formerly deadly diseases.

One of the first and still one of the most widely used antibiotic agents, derived from mold. 

In 1928 Scottish bacteriologist Alexander Fleming first observed that colonies of the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus failed to grow in those areas of a culture that had been accidentally contaminated by a green mold. He isolated the mold, grew it in a fluid medium, and found that it produced a substance capable of killing many of the common bacteria that infect humans.


Number Three was among the first medications to be effective against many bacterial infections caused by staphylococci and streptococci. They are still widely used today, though many types of bacterial have developed resistance following extensive use.



Murphy's Laws


O'Reilly's Law of the Kitchen. . .


Cleanliness is next to impossible.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Go for the Juggler!


Monday, November 26, 2018

#4 - "In Synch"



#5 was Optical Lenses! Guess the MA followers were included in this one as Elaine, Tony and Milt from MA were accounted for while out-of-staters Peyton, Joani, and Mike got their blog on time. 




"In Synch"




I had known of Slater's Mill in nearby Rhode Island for many years but never been there. I finally packed up my mirrorless and my new macro lens and headed off to see this iconic place. As luck would have it, my tour group was only seven people which gave me ample space and time to stop and shoot the "industrial." Tripods were not allowed so I had to rely on a higher ISO and my steady hands.

The intricate detail needed to run these machines successfully was obvious. These three gear wheels were typical of the craftsmanship and durability of the designers of our early Industrial Age.


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#4 shapes the physical foundation of the virtual world!


#4 are electronic components that exploit the electronic properties of  materials, principally silicon, germanium, and gallium arsenide. 

They have replaced thermionic devices (vacuum tubes) in most applications. They use electronic conduction in the solid state as opposed to the gaseous state or thermionic emission in a high vacuum.


These devices made per year have been growing by 9.1% on average since 1978 and shipments in 2018 are predicted for the first time to exceed 1 trillion, meaning well over 7 trillion has been made to date, in just in the decade prior!


Murphy's Laws


Occam's Electric Axiom. . .


The most difficult light bulb to replace 
burns out first and most frequently.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Eye Doctor's Parking Area!"


Monday, November 19, 2018

#5 - "Twin Shut-offs"



#6 was paper! Something running afoul with this blog as once again those outside of Massachusetts go to see it - Peyton, Mike, and Joani while our in-staters were closed out.




"Twin Shut-offs"



As I mentioned several entries ago, the Stone Mill had been stripped of much of its inner workings. I struggled to find items of interest to fill the time there. Over in the corner, near what once was the floor's only bathroom were these two shut-off valves - "the twins!"

Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#5

At Number Five: 
Refracting light through glass is one of those simple ideas that took a mysteriously long time to catch on. “The Romans had a glass industry, and there’s even a passage in Seneca about the optical effects of a glass bowl of water.”  But it was centuries before the invention of #5 dramatically raised the collective human IQ, and eventually led to the creation of the microscope and the telescope.


This week’s invention is a transmissive optical device that focuses or disperses a light beam by means of refraction.

This Top Ten Winner can be made from materials such as glass or plastic, and are ground and polished or molded to a desired shape. 



Murphy's Laws


 Ophthalmologist's Principle. . .


A flying particle will seek the nearest eye.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Hard Homework"


Monday, November 12, 2018

#6 - "Unplugged!"



#7 was the internal combustible engine! Can't fool this group - Elaine, Mike, Tony, Peyton, and Joani!




"Unplugged!"



When I reached the top floor of the Stone Mill, I saw a strange-looking object at the far end. It looked like an electric chair! It had the wires connecting to it and the head gear I had seen on TV. I thought this would make a most interesting capture. There was a guy fiddling around in front of it and I thought he would never leave. Turns out he was the man who crafted this chair. 

Well, he did leave me alone with his device so all I needed was a subject to sit in it. Not seeing anyone around, I decided to ghost it. This is when you have a long exposure and you position yourself in the frame for upwards of half of that exposure time. After several experiments, I had it just right!

Of course, I checked the plugs just BEFORE I sat down EVERY time!  


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#6

second century

“The idea of stamping images is natural if you have #6, but until then, it’s economically unaffordable.” — Charles C. Mann

 It is a thin material produced by pressing together moist fibres of cellulose pulp derived from wood, rags, or grasses and drying them into flexible sheets. It is a versatile material with many uses, including writing, printing packaging, cleaning, and a number of industrial and construction processes.


The pulp making process is said to have been developed in China during the early 2nd century, possibly as early as the year 105 AD by the Han court although the earliest archaeological fragments of #6 derive from the 2nd century BC in China. The modern industry is global, with China leading its production and the United States right behind it.


Murphy's Laws


Journalistic Principle. . .


If a headline ends in a question mark, 
the answer is no.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Between Two Evils"


Monday, November 5, 2018

#7 - "Downspout Patina"



#8 was vaccination! Heard from Elaine, Milt, Peyton, Joani, Mike, Jeff W. and Doris! Not too late to get your flu shot!




"Downspout Patina"



This downspout was almost a missed shot. I was driving home from shooting some lighthouses in CT when I noticed an old stone church on the corner. I drove another two minutes down the road before I decided it was worth making a u-turn. The building was a small chapel on the grounds of an old cemetery -  the Avery Cemetery Chapel. I shot the structure from several angles before I noticed this downspout. It had character in its design and its patina. Although I thought the chapel looked best as a monochromatic, I had to allow those viewing this to see it as it was shot - that green against the stone!


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#7

Late 19th century
#7 turned air and fuel into power, eventually replacing the steam engine (No. 10)

The first commercially successful device was created by Lenoir around 1859 and the first modern one was created in 1876 by Nikolaus Otto.

#7 usually refers to a machine with two-stroke pistons, along with variants, such as the six-stroke and the Wankel Rotary. Firearms are also a form of #7.


Typically #Seven is fed with fossil fuels like natural gas or petroleum products. There is a growing usage renewable fuels. Hydrogen is sometimes used, and can be obtained from either fossil fuels or renewable energy.



Murphy's Laws


 Lynch's Law. . .


When the going gets tough, 
everybody leaves.



Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Appreciation"


Monday, October 29, 2018

#8 - "Stone Mill II"



#9 was the Internet! Glitch with #9 invention kept this week's blog out of the homes of hundreds of my followers. It appears those out-of-state (Peyton, Joani, and Mike Di.) fared better than the home-grown ones! 




"Stone Mill II"



 The Stone Mill was the meeting location for my Scott Kelby 2016 Photo Walk. Because of the threat of rain, I decided to drive the extra distance as there was an option to shoot indoors. And, did it rain - many of the other Walks in New England were cancelled. So we spent a great part of our shoot inside the old mills.

I walked by this shot a few times knowing that there was something there. The lighting and the contrast on the building was causing me concern. With my trusty tripod in hand, I went the way of HDR as I took five shots of this from an over exposure of 2 stops to an under one of 2 stops as well. Then with the help of PhotoShop and NIK filters I was able to combine them into this final frame.

Each Photo Walk leader is allowed to choose one image from his group to submit to Kelby for further honors. My "Stone Mill" was the 2016 Choice for the Lawrence Mills Shoot! (ED Note - my 2017 shot also took top honors in my photo group!)


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

Getting closer to Numero Uno!!

#8 


is the administration of an antigenic to stimulate an individual’s immune system to develop adaptive immunity to a pathogen. They can prevent or ameliorate infectious diseases. When a sufficiently large percentage of a population has gone through #8, herd immunity results. It is the most effective method of preventing infectious diseases; widespread immunity is largely responsible for the worldwide eradication of smallpox and polio, measles, etc. 

Murphy's Laws


Jones' Law (aka Nixon's Law). . .


The man who can smile when things go wrong -- 
has thought of someone he can blame it on.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"iPhone Accessory"