Monday, April 16, 2018

#36 - "Frozen in Its Tracks!"




#37 Cementing their place among the correct responders were Joani, Michelle, Mike, Milt, Elaine, and Peyton.




"Frozen in Its Tracks!"



Just how cold was it at the Haul of Fame? Look for yourself - that was solid ice in those small collecting areas. This shot was a partial capture of the tracks on this tractor. When I got home and played around with it, the title came immediately. I thought it was pretty clever!


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#36

A less heralded cousin of it will come in at #10.

These are the backbone of today’s energy infrastructure: they generate 80 percent of the world’s power!

The modern device was invented in 1884 by Sir Charles Parsons, whose first model was connected to a dynamo that generated 7.5 kW (10 hp) of electricity. His invention made cheap and plentiful electricity possible and revolutionized marine transport and naval warfare.


I realize these clues are not very helpful so if you still need help, go to the bottom of this week's blog for multiple choices. . . 

Murphy's Laws


 McGregor's Revised Maxim. . .


The shortest distance between two points is 
under construction.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Growing Old. . ."



1. light bulb   2. generator   3. steam turbine  4. the battery 

Monday, April 9, 2018

#37 - "A Window Crank"



#38 Scientific Plant Breeding - Michelle, Joani, Elaine, Mike, and Peyton!




"A Window Crank"



As I mentioned earlier, the Stone Mill had its challenges - mainly finding items to focus upon. Forced to look in the dark corners, behind the partially opened doors and even in the ceilings, I saw this device used to provide ventilation or possibly to release whatever odors were trapped in the room. A simply pulley and chain allowed a worker to open up the ceiling - early air conditioning. Greatly appreciated in these large mill buildings!

Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#37

The foundation of civilization - literally! 

Used by the Egyptians some 2600 years ago. A hydraulic binder, sort of a glue. . . China is the #1 producer of this with India and the US following a distance second and third.
Medieval masons and some military engineers maintained an active tradition of using the hydraulic version of #37 in structures such as canals, fortresses, ship building facilities, etc.


The technical knowledge for making this was formalized by French and British engineers in the 18th century.

I realize these clues are not very helpful so if you still need help, go to the bottom of this week's blog for multiple choices. . . 

Murphy's Laws


Perversity of Nature Law. . .


You cannot successfully determine beforehand 
which side of the bread to butter!


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Vegan Violence"



a. brakes   b. cement   c. bread-making   d. elevators


Monday, April 2, 2018

#38 - "My What Big Teeth. . ."



#39 was Oil Drilling! Well done - Michelle, Tony, Elaine, Joani, Peyton, and Mike!




"My, What Big Teeth!"



Back to back from the Haul of Fame


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#38


Humans have been manipulating this from the beginning of time. But it wasn’t until early 20th century that scientists discovered a forgotten 1866 paper by the Austrian Gregor Mendel that we figured out how this worked.

It is the art and science of changing the traits of things in order to produce desired characteristics. This can be accomplished through many different techniques ranging from simply selection to methods that make use of knowledge of genetics and chromosomes. 


It is practiced worldwide by individuals such as gardeners and farmers, or by professionals employed by organizations such as government  institutions, universities, or research centers.



I realize these clues are not very helpful so if you still need help, go to the bottom of this week's blog for multiple choices. . . 

Murphy's Laws

Montgomery's Maxim. . .


If at first you don't succeed -
 read the manual.


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .



"Road Curse. . ."



 a. the clock    b. plant breeding   c. plowing   d. greenhouses 

Monday, March 26, 2018

#39 - "The Drive Chain"



#40 was the sailboat as Milt, Tony, Joani, and Elaine figured out. So close with a great guess of the compass was Michelle.




"The Drive Chain"




This is my first image from the Haul of Fame to share with you! This graveyard of rusting trucks, buses, and earth-moving equipment was a photographer's paradise. Our small group spent several hours moving about the acreage of the yard. Amazing in that we came back with hundreds of different views of the used vehicles - they were very few duplicates among what we shot.

Here, the drive chain was coiled around the rear sprockets. Reminded me of the chain that powered my Raleigh bike back when. This one was about ten times the thickness and weight as the one I remembered.


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#39

Fueled the modern economy, established its geopolitics

The earliest attempts in modern times were accomplished, by repeatedly raising and dropping a cable tool into the earth. In the 20th century, cable tools were largely replaced with a rotary technique, which could reach much greater depths and in less time. 


Until the 1970s, most of these were vertical, however, modern technologies allow for them to be horizontal.

I realize these clues are not very helpful so if you still need help, go to the bottom of this week's blog for multiple choices. . . 



Murphy's Laws


Q’s Law. . .


No matter what stage of completion one reaches in a project, 
the cost of the remainder of the project - 
remains the same!


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Sunburn Markings"



a. Elevator  b. Phone lines  c. Oil drilling   d. Wrecking ball 



Monday, March 19, 2018

#40 - "Pump Gauge. . ."




#41 was the rocket as Peyton, Tony, Mike, Elaine, and Joani figured out!




"Pump Gauge"



Back to the Charles River Museum for this week's "industrial." Over in the corner there was a vintage gasoline pump. It was interesting but not worthy of wasting a frame on my SD card. Off to the side there was the gallons pumped indicator. Now I had something! I came in very tight - filling the entire frame with the gauge. Yes, that is a light source above the numeral window. 

There was no info as to why there were both positive and negative digits on the pump (could it be that the pump sucked gas from your vehicle???) 


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#40
transformed travel, warfare, and our view of the world!

This invention  is thought to have made its debut in Mesopotamia, over five thousand years ago - though primitive by today’s standard. Unfortunately this device was restricted in its movement - one direction primarily.

The Vikings, on the other hand, were different. They were stubborn and slave-less, and refused to be told by the elements were they could or could not go. The Vikings perfected the bottom of #40


Over the years adjustments were made to the equipment to reach the sophistication of today’s products





Murphy's Laws


Peter's Theorem. . .


Incompetence 
plus 
incompetence 
equals 
incompetence!


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"Rare Sighting - Planets in Alignment. . ."



Monday, March 12, 2018

#41 - "Locking Mechanism. . ."




#42 was paper money - sorry, I couldn't do better on the clues but several of you came through! Tony, Elaine, Mike, Joani, Peyton, and Jeff W. (not telling you which ones though. . .)




"Locking Mechanism"



Another source of my "industrial" images was the Stone Mill in Lawrence, MA. I had two opportunities to move around this abandoned former factory when I signed onto a Scott Kelby Photo Walk. Back in 2016 about eight photo walkers meandered throughout the three floors of the mill. There wasn't a lot left inside the facility, so I had to really comb the nooks and crannies for anything still hanging around.

I was fascinated by this latch: its age, the scratches around it, the discoloration around it, and its simplicity. Certainly not keeping top secrets behind this door with this level of security!


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.

#41

The name for #41 comes from the Italian rocchetta, meaning "bobbin" or "little spindle," given due to the similarity in shape to the bobbin or spool used to hold the thread to be fed to a spinning wheel.

The first ones were powered by gunpowder in the medieval Chinese Song dynasty around the 13th century. 

The first iron-cased ones were developed in the late 18th century in the Kingdom of Mysore (currently part of India).


Based directly on the Mysorean models, the British designed and developed a more sophisticated type in 1804.



Murphy's Laws


Murchison's Law of Money. . .


Money is like manure. . .
If you spread it around, it does a lot of good. 
But if you pile it up in one place, it stinks like hell.

(don't know about you but I can stand the smell!)



Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .


"Attitude Adjustment. . ."



Monday, March 5, 2018

#42 - "Hooked!"



#43 was the abacus! Well done my little calculating friends - Michelle, Elaine, Joani, Mike, and Doris returned for this one! Tough one this week. . .




"Hooked!"





Dilemma? Should I post "Hooked" in Color or B&W? Tough call, so you got both! 

These large chains and the hook were dangling in a corner of the Boston Waterworks Museum. I must have walked around it a half-dozen times looking for just the right angle to capture it. I was able to blacken out the background giving the chains a more defined look and feel.

So, Color or B&W????


Greatest Inventions of All Time!
Recently I came across an article about the greatest inventions as determined by a large group of scientists, philosophers, educators, and other professions. Their task was to create a list of "the Greatest Inventions of All Time." Conveniently, the final list numbered fifty! so, I'm starting with #50 and working my way down to Numero Uno in December.

Fear not as I will offer you some hints as to what the invention was.


#42

#42 was first developed in Tang Dynasty in China during the 7th century, although this true invention did not appear until the 11th century, during the Song Dynasty. Its usage later spread throughout the Mongol Empire. 

European explorers like Marco Polo introduced the concept in Europe during the 13th century. Napoleon issued this in the early 1800s.


Originally precious metals were the main method until #42 became popular!

Sorry, it's the best I can do with this one. . .


Murphy's Laws



Montgomery's Maxim. . .

If at first you don't succeed -
read the manual!


Leaving You with a Laugh, I Hope. . .

"And, Keep the Change. . ."